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The Crystal Reef: How Climate Change Is Affecting Our Oceans | 360 | TIME
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The Crystal Reef: How Climate Change Is Affecting Our Oceans | 360 | TIME

This 360 video shows how climate change is affecting the world’s reefs and oceans. Subscribe to TIME ►► http://po.st/SubscribeTIME Half of the world’s coral reefs have died in the last 30 years. New research in the journal Nature shows that even if people succeed in protecting reefs from pollution and overfishing, global warming remains a deadly threat. In The Crystal Reef, viewers meet marine scientist Dr. Fio Micheli and see the effects of climate change. With Micheli, viewers explore a rocky reef off the coast of Italy to learn about ocean acidification and the toll that human-produced carbon dioxide is taking on the reef. The Crystal Reef was produced by Cody Karutz. He worked with Stanford University’s Virtual Human Interaction Lab (VHIL) to create the experience. The Crystal Reef is now offered on Blue Trot and LIFE VR. Get closer to the world of entertainment and celebrity news as TIME gives you access and insight on the people who make what you watch, read and share. https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL2EFFA5DB900C633F Money helps you learn how to spend and invest your money. Find advice and guidance you can count on from how to negotiate, how to save and everything in between. https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLYOGLpQQfhNKdqS_Wccs94rMHiajrRr4W Find out more about the latest developments in science and technology as TIME’s access brings you to the ideas and people changing our world. https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLYOGLpQQfhNIzsgcwqhT6ctKOfHfyuaL3 Let TIME show you everything you need to know about drones, autonomous cars, smart devices and the latest inventions which are shaping industries and our way of living https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL2862F811BE8F5623 Stay up to date on breaking news from around the world through TIME’s trusted reporting, insight and access https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLYOGLpQQfhNJeIsW3A2d5Bs22Wc3PHma6 CONNECT WITH TIME Web: http://time.com/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/TIME Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/time Google+: https://plus.google.com/+TIME/videos Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/time/?hl=en Magazine: http://time.com/magazine/ Newsletter: time.com/newsletter ABOUT TIME TIME brings unparalleled insight, access and authority to the news. A 24/7 news publication with nearly a century of experience, TIME’s coverage shapes how we understand our world. Subscribe for daily news, interviews, science, technology, politics, health, entertainment, and business updates, as well as exclusive videos from TIME’s Person of the Year, TIME 100 and more created by TIME’s acclaimed writers, producers and editors. The Crystal Reef: How Climate Change Is Affecting Our Oceans | 360 | TIME https://www.youtube.com/user/TimeMagazine
His Epic Message Will Make You Want to Save the World | Short Film Showcase
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His Epic Message Will Make You Want to Save the World | Short Film Showcase

As the human population continues to grow, so does our impact on the environment. In fact, recent research has shown that three-quarters of Earth’s land surface is under pressure from human activity. In this short film, spoken word artist Prince Ea makes a powerful case for protecting the planet and challenges the human race to create a sustainable future. Winner of the Film4Climate competition organized by the Connect4Climate Program of the World Bank (film4climate.net). ➡ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/NatGeoSubscribe ➡ Get More Short Film Showcase: http://bit.ly/ShortFilmShowcase About Short Film Showcase: The Short Film Showcase spotlights exceptional short videos created by filmmakers from around the web and selected by National Geographic editors. We look for work that affirms National Geographic's belief in the power of science, exploration, and storytelling to change the world. The filmmakers created the content presented, and the opinions expressed are their own, not those of National Geographic Partners. See more from National Geographic's Short Film Showcase at http://documentary.com Get More National Geographic: Official Site: http://bit.ly/NatGeoOfficialSite Facebook: http://bit.ly/FBNatGeo Twitter: http://bit.ly/NatGeoTwitter Instagram: http://bit.ly/NatGeoInsta About National Geographic: National Geographic is the world's premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what's possible. Read more about the impact humans have on the environment: http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2016/08/human-footprint-map-ecological-impact/ Three Seconds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sacc_x-XB1Y His Epic Message Will Make You Want to Save the World | Short Film Showcase https://youtu.be/B-nEYsyRlYo National Geographic https://www.youtube.com/natgeo
How Whales Change Climate
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How Whales Change Climate

Explore how whales change climate, engineer the ecosystem, create conditions that spawn plankton, and keep our oceans healthy in this beautiful story by George Monbiot. 🌍 LIKE, SUBSCRIBE, and SIGN UP FOR NOTIFICATIONS 🌍 Support monthly us on Patreon ⟹ patreon.com/sustainablehuman 🌍 One-time donation ⟹ sustainablehuman.org/donate/ Sustainable Human is a 501c3 non-profit whose mission is to examine the underlying stories that give rise to the environmental, social, and economic crises of our time and offer new stories that help humanity to live in harmony with each other and the biosphere. 🌍 Learn more ⟹ https://sustainablehuman.org/stories/how-whales-change-climate 🌍 Help us translate this video ⟹ sustainablehuman.org/translate/ TRANSCRIPT: One of the most exciting scientific findings of the past half century has been the discovery of widespread trophic cascades. A trophic cascade is an ecological process which starts at the top of the food chain and tumbles all the way down to the bottom. We all know that whales eat fish and krill and some people have argued that killing whales is good for human beings as it boosts the food available for us to eat - and so you would think. But as the great whales declined so did the numbers of fish and krill. It seems counterintuitive - surely their numbers would rise as their major predators disappeared - but it now turns out that whales not only eat these animals they also keep them alive. In fact, they help to sustain the entire living system of the ocean. Whales feed a depth in waters that are often pitch dark and then they return to the surface to the photic zone where there's enough light for photosynthesis to happen. There they release what biologists call fecal plumes - vast outpourings of poo - poonamis. These plumes are rich in iron and nitrogen - nutrients which are often very scarce in the surface waters and these nutrients fertilize plant plankton that lives in the only place where plants can survive - the photic zone. Fertilizing the surface waters isn't the only thing the whales do. By plunging up and down through the water column, they also keep kicking the plankton back up into the photic zone giving it more time to reproduce before it sinks into the abyss. Even today, the whale populations have been greatly reduced, the vertical mixing of water caused by movements of animals up and down through the column of the oceans is astonishingly roughly the same as the amount of mixing caused by all the world's wind and waves and tides. More plant plankton means more animal plankton on which a larger creatures then feed. In other words, more whales means more fish and krill. But the story doesn't end here because plant plankton not only feeds the animals of the sea, it also absorbs carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. When eventually it sinks to the ocean floor, it takes this carbon out of circulation down to a place where it remains for thousands of years. The more whales there are, the more plankton there is. The more plankton there is the more carbon is drawn out of the air. When whales were at their historic populations, before great numbers of them were killed, it seems that they might have been responsible for removing tens of millions of tons of carbon from the atmosphere every year. Whales change the climate. FAIR USE NOTICE: This video may contain copyrighted material. Such material is made available for educational purposes only. This constitutes a 'fair use' of any such copyrighted material as provided for in Title 17 U.S.C. section 106A-117 of the US Copyright Law. Academic Sources: Stephen Nicol et al, 2010. Southern Ocean iron fertilization by baleen whales and Antarctic krill. Fish and Fisheries, vol 11, pp 203–209. Kakani Katija and John O. Dabiri, 2009. A viscosity-enhanced mechanism for biogenic ocean mixing. Nature, Vol. 460, pp 624-627. doi:10.1038/nature08207 Joe Roman and James J. McCarthy, 2010) The Whale Pump: Marine Mammals Enhance Primary Productivity in a Coastal Basin. PLoS ONE vol 5 no 10, pp 1-8. doi:10.1371/ journal.pone.0013255 Daniel G. Boyce, Marlon R. Lewis and Boris Worm, 2010. Global phytoplankton decline over the past century. Nature, Vol. 466, pp591-596. doi:10.1038/nature09268 Steve Nichol, 12th July 2011. Vital Giants: why living seas need whales. New Scientist, No.2820. http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg21128201.700-vital-giants-why-living-seas-need-whales.html Trish J. Lavery et al, 2010. Iron defecation by sperm whales stimulates carbon export in the Southern Ocean. Proceedings of the Royal Society: B. Vol 277, pp 3527-3531. doi: 10.1098/rspb.2010.0863 James A. Estes, et al, 2011. Trophic Downgrading of Planet Earth. Science, Vol 333, pp 301-306. doi: 10.1126/science.1205106 #ClimateChange #Whales #TrophicCascades
Kerstin Forsberg On Changing The Way Marine Conservation Works | Next Generation Leaders | TIME
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Kerstin Forsberg On Changing The Way Marine Conservation Works | Next Generation Leaders | TIME

Kerstin Forsberg is the founder of Planeta Oceano. She discusses manta ray and marine conservation within the fishing communities of Peru. Subscribe to TIME ►► http://po.st/SubscribeTIME Get closer to the world of entertainment and celebrity news as TIME gives you access and insight on the people who make what you watch, read and share. https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL2EFFA5DB900C633F Money helps you learn how to spend and invest your money. Find advice and guidance you can count on from how to negotiate, how to save and everything in between. https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLYOGLpQQfhNKdqS_Wccs94rMHiajrRr4W Find out more about the latest developments in science and technology as TIME’s access brings you to the ideas and people changing our world. https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLYOGLpQQfhNIzsgcwqhT6ctKOfHfyuaL3 Let TIME show you everything you need to know about drones, autonomous cars, smart devices and the latest inventions which are shaping industries and our way of living https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL2862F811BE8F5623 Stay up to date on breaking news from around the world through TIME’s trusted reporting, insight and access https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLYOGLpQQfhNJeIsW3A2d5Bs22Wc3PHma6 CONNECT WITH TIME Web: http://time.com/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/TIME Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/time Google+: https://plus.google.com/+TIME/videos Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/time/?hl=en Magazine: http://time.com/magazine/ Newsletter: time.com/newsletter ABOUT TIME TIME brings unparalleled insight, access and authority to the news. A 24/7 news publication with nearly a century of experience, TIME’s coverage shapes how we understand our world. Subscribe for daily news, interviews, science, technology, politics, health, entertainment, and business updates, as well as exclusive videos from TIME’s Person of the Year, TIME 100 and more created by TIME’s acclaimed writers, producers and editors. Kerstin Forsberg On Changing The Way Marine Conservation Works | Next Generation Leaders | TIME https://www.youtube.com/user/TimeMagazine
How Big The Great Pacific Garbage Patch Really Is
03:19

How Big The Great Pacific Garbage Patch Really Is

Eight million tons of plastic winds up into the world’s oceans every year, much of that accumulating in the Great Pacific Garbage Patch. That 80,000 tons of fishing net, bottles, and other trash has more pieces of plastic than there are stars in the Milky Way Galaxy. And it’s only getting bigger. ------------------------------------------------------ #GreatPacificGarbagePatch #Recycling Science Insider tells you all you need to know about science: space, medicine, biotech, physiology, and more. Subscribe to our channel and visit us at: http://www.businessinsider.com/science Science Insider on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BusinessInsiderScience/ Science Insider on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/science_insider/ Business Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/businessinsider Tech Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/techinsider ------------------------------------------------------ How Big The Great Pacific Garbage Patch Really Is Following is a transcript of the video: Plastic is a massive problem that we as humans face and have subjected upon the other beings we share this planet with. In the middle of the ocean lies the Giant Pacific Garbage Patch that shows us just how much this problem has gotten out of hand. Here are some comparisons on how massive the Giant Pacific Garbage Patch is. Following is a transcript of the video. The world produces enough plastic each year to build 50 Pyramids of Giza. That’s over 350 million tons of candy wrappers, PVC pipes, and synthetic t-shirts. While most of it ends up in landfills 8 million tons wind up in our oceans each year. Where most finds its way into massive garbage patches around the world. And the biggest of them all is called the Great Pacific Garbage Patch. How Big The Great Pacific Garbage Patch Really Is. If you picked up each piece of plastic in the Great Pacific Garbage Patch you’d carry away about 1.8 trillion individual pieces. That’s ten times more than there are stars in our Milky Way Galaxy. And it would weigh a whopping 80,000 tons. Equivalent to the weight of three Statues of Liberty. Half of the entire patch is made of plastic fishing nets, lines, and ropes, which come from intense fishing activity near the area. The other half is mostly hard plastics and films, like water bottles and plastic wrap. But don’t let the name “Great Pacific Garbage Patch” fool you. It doesn’t look like a giant mountain of trash at all. It’s actually scattered over a region of ocean that’s twice the size of Texas, according to some estimates. So if you wanted to pick up every piece of plastic, it would take you 121 days at a walking pace of 5 km/hr to cover the entire area. Though in reality, there’s no true end since the garbage patch is constantly ebbing and flowing with the ocean currents. But let’s pretend you could scoop it all up into one place. There’d be enough plastic to fill 100 Boeing 747 planes! And the patch is only getting bigger. It’s been growing exponentially larger for nearly 70 years. Partly because once the plastic is there it’ll stick around for centuries. Those plastic fishing lines, for example, will take 600 years to break down. And even after they break down, the damage doesn’t stop there. Most end up as microplastics that are too small to see with the naked eye. But can make it into the bellies of sea animals and ultimately the humans that eat those animals. Worldwide, researchers have found ingested microplastics in, every species of sea turtle. Nearly 60% of whale species. And almost 60% of seabirds. Plus, more plastic is pouring into the world’s oceans each day. In fact, experts estimate that by the year 2050 the amount of plastic in the oceans will outweigh all the world’s fish. Think about that the next time you toss your water bottle in the trash because the recycling’s full.
An ingenious proposal for scaling up marine protection | The Nature Conservancy
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An ingenious proposal for scaling up marine protection | The Nature Conservancy

Island and coastal nations need to protect their waters to keep the oceans healthy. But they often have lots of debt and aren't able to prioritize ocean conservation over other needs. The team at The Nature Conservancy sees a way to solve both problems at once: restructuring a nation's debt in exchange for its government's commitment to protect coastal areas. Learn more about how "Blue Bonds for Conservation" work -- and how you can help unlock billions of dollars for the oceans. This ambitious plan is a part of the Audacious Project, TED's initiative to inspire and fund global change. (Voiced by Ladan Wise) Get TED Talks recommended just for you! Learn more at https://www.ted.com/signup. The TED Talks channel features the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design -- plus science, business, global issues, the arts and more. You're welcome to link to or embed these videos, forward them to others and share these ideas with people you know. For more information on using TED for commercial purposes (e.g. employee learning, in a film or online course), please submit a Media Request here: https://media-requests.ted.com/ Follow TED on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/TEDTalks Like TED on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TED Subscribe to our channel: https://www.youtube.com/TED